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Reversing the Change is all about the reaction,the FDI Raj all over culminating in Greek Tragedy! Governance of fascism has the ultimate task to accomplish, to rewrite the history with economic reforms to reverse the renaissance real reforms! Different story of Colonial India and the shift in Indian historiography!

Reversing the Change is all about the reaction,the FDI Raj all over culminating  in Greek Tragedy!

Governance of fascism has the ultimate task to accomplish, to rewrite the history with economic reforms to reverse the renaissance real reforms!

Different story of Colonial India and the shift in Indian historiography!


Palash Biswas

Reversing the Change is all about the reaction,the FDI Raj all over culminating  in Greek Tragedy!


Sumit Sarkar is among the most influential and widely admired historians of modern India. His several books include 'The Swadeshi Movement in Bengal', 'Modern India 1885 - 1947', 'Writing Social History' and 'Beyond Nationalist Frames'. Following a distinguished teaching career, he retired as Professor of History, Delhi University. He lives in New Delhi and is working on his next book.

While Indian history is inflicted with post modern mythical nationalism blind to accomplish the racist unicolor shafron Globe under governance of fascism,we should read,Modern Times written by Sumit Sarkar to refresh our vision as far as Indian history is concerned as the roots of racist fascism lies in colonial roots.


We may not decode the partition plus holocaust politics,political communalism introduced in Raj by the comradors of imperialism which have further converted in neo liberal free market India and captured everything to sell off everything unless we understand the phenomenon of indigenous relations in the production system which have been destroyed with the economy as well as economy and the indigenous aborigin humanscape on which I am trying to focus again and again.


In a time while the class caste hegemony converting the state into a military state of ethnic cleansing,agenda being exclusion all on the name of inclulisive Manusmriti order,brute and racist,business friendly governace becomes the philosophy,aesthetics and grammar of fascism, Sumit Sarkar tells a different story on colonial India we should be interested in.As Vernon Hewitt writes:


Sarkar begins with a succinct summary of the epistemological changes that have characterized Indian history since the late 1970s, the shifts away from empirical,'top down' accounts of imperialism; simplified accounts of nationalist awakening and liberation using historical 'stages', and structural Marxist and class based accounts of the colonial state. In the post-Saidian, Foucauldian world not only has the focus of history shifted downwards towards the production and reproduction of cultural artifacts, but also to the specific contexts in which these operated and gave form to particular and contingent economic and political participation. This localism, inspired in part by subaltern studies but pressed on by most poststructural and post-modern scholars (of various hues), stresses both the complecity of the colonial encounter, but also the often unpredictable and ambiguous dynamics generated by the deepening of British colonial administration which Sarkar takes as the hallmark of the late 19th century.


Yes,the phrase,"unpredictable and ambiguous dynamics generated by the deepening of British colonial administration which Sarkar takes as the hallmark of the late 19th century."is very significant as the ruling hegemony roots back into the permanent land settlement act introduced by East India company and in modern times,economic reforms mean every crime against humanity should be legal in absence of equality,justice,pluralism and tolerance,complete genocide culture and politics reduced to Rape Tsunami and most intensive hate campaign as we experience in progressive liberal Bengal nowadays inflicted with religious polarisation quite vertical meaning self destruction.

Yes it has been all the way the change taking place as the focus of history shifted downwards towards the production and reproduction of cultural artifacts, but also to the specific contexts in which these operated and gave form to particular and contingent economic and political participation.in the couse of modern times which reflects  in Indian politics,society and econmoy today being the greatest cause of headache as land reforms by the Left Front in Benagl and nationalisation by Indira Gandhi and the constitutional provision of reservation and constitutional safeguards for the excluded agrarian communities have always been.


The Hindutva agenda to ambush the Global Order is nothing but to ambush the change taken over the Manusmriti Rule and inherent caste,identity and untouchability,set way back in nineteenth century.


The Hindutva agenda is all about the task incomplete even after making India a Hindu nation via partition and shifting the demography with infinite displacement under Salawa Judum or Afspa rule.


Governance of fascism has the ultimate task to rewrite the history with economic reforms to reverse the renaissance real reforms!


I have been insisting that indigenous,aborigin rural India was never enslaved.Sarkar and others from academia use the term as localism, inspired in part by subaltern studies but pressed on by most poststructural and post-modern scholars (of various hues).


Hence I am focusing on Indigenous negroid demography and history and tracing the missing links!


Sumit Sarkar - Writing a Marxian Social History of Modern ...

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Jul 23, 2010 - Uploaded by Adrian Cousins
Sumit Sarkar is one of the foremost historians of modern India. His books include Swadeshi Movement in ...

Sumit sarkar - YouTube

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Jan 24, 2013 - Uploaded by Sumit Sarkar
i am sumit sarkar. ... Sumit Sarkar - Writing a Marxian Social History of Modern India: Problems and Prospects ...

Modern Social Problems, Feb 19th Virtual Class, part 2 ...

Feb 19, 2014 - Modern Social Problems, Feb 19th Virtual Class, part 2 .... Chris Hedges on What it Takes to be a Rebel in Modern Times - Duration: 16:35. by ... Sumit Sarkar - Writing a Marxian Social History of Modern India: Problems and ...

Sumeet Sarkar: This Time - Jonathan Rhys Meyers - YouTube

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Dec 31, 2013 - Uploaded by Bluestringfusion
Jonathan Rhys Meyer - This Time (Rendition by Sumeet Sarkar) I made this rendition to express my road to ...

sumit sarkar, historian - YouTube

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Jan 30, 2014 - Uploaded by TSN
sumit sarkar, historian. TSN ... Sumit Sarkar - Writing a Marxian Social History of Modern India ...

Presenting A New Synthesis


Vernon Hewitt


MODERN TIMES 1880S–1950S: ENVIRONMENT, ECONOMY AND CULTURE

By Sumit Sarkar

Permanent Black, New Delhi, 2014, pp. i –ivi 435, Rs. 806.00


VOLUME XXXIX NUMBER 2 February 2015


Modern Times is the first of a promised two part work in which Professor Sarkar sets out to review the current state of 19th and 20th century Indian historiography, and to add to his own already remarkable oeuvre. The work does not disappoint, and while there is much here that is already familiar to the student of Indian history, especially concerning debates about the impact of colonialism, modernity and capitalism, there is also originality and extraordinary breadth. What is presented is not a revised version of his own classic Modern India, but in effect a new synthesis of Sarkar's earlier ideas, structured around new archival materials and recent methodological innovations. The arguments are set out chronologically and thematically. Sarkar begins with a succinct summary of the epistemological changes that have characterized Indian history since the late 1970s, the shifts away from empirical,'top down' accounts of imperialism; simplified accounts of nationalist awakening and liberation using historical 'stages', and structural Marxist and class based accounts of the colonial state. In the post-Saidian, Foucauldian world not only has the focus of history shifted downwards towards the production and reproduction of cultural artifacts, but also to the specific contexts in which these operated and gave form to particular and contingent economic and political participation. This localism, inspired in part by subaltern studies but pressed on by most poststructural and post-modern scholars (of various hues), stresses both the complecity of the colonial encounter, but also the often unpredictable and ambiguous dynamics generated by the deepening of British colonial administration which Sarkar takes as the hallmark of the late 19th century. Sarkar maps and analyses these dynamics across an impressive array of data and sub-fields of Indian history; political and institutional reform, colonial law and missionary activity, and land reform with particular attention to recent work on the environmental impact of the Raj. In the final section, headed Society and Culture, there is an impressive discussion of the construction of urban spaces and a summary of recent work on the rise of popular culture, entertainment and sport. All of these activities created new forms of interaction within the growing metropoles of late 19th century India, or reconfigured existing recreation for different participants. In each section of this densely worked book, Sarkar examines the impact of the colonial encounter by stressing not so much a Saidian imposition of the western ...

http://www.thebookreviewindia.org/articles/archives-4339/2015/february/2/presenting-a-new-synthesis.html


Modern Times : India 1880s - 1950s (English) 1st Edition (Hardcover) Price: Rs. 895

Much has changed in the world of South Asian history-writing since Sumit Sarkars renowned classic, Modern India (1983). The passage of thirty years having rendered that work thoroughly dated, the futility of any attempt to revise it became increasingly clear to me, especially as over this period my own historical perspectives took new and unexpected directions, says the author. The present work is an entirely fresh view of the same period.


Focusing on three huge areas - Economy, Environment and Culture - Professor Sarkar offers his magisterial perspective on these.


Scientific discourses, laws, forest administration, peasants and adivasis, irrigation and conflicts over land-use are examined, as are agrarian relations, commercialization, indebtedness and famine. Trade, finance and industry are other major focus areas.


Modern urban India is scrutinized via the literature on its big cities. Sociabilities, caste configurations and public culture (Theater, cinema and sports) are discussed, as are literature, dance, music and painting.


In conclusion, says Professor Sarkar, 'I have within each chapter incorporated the relevant historiographical developments, changes and debates. Separate bibliographical sections will I hope facilitate the work of teachers and students.


http://www.flipkart.com/modern-times-india-1880s-1950s-english-1st/p/itmeyyhmdsqchgwn?pid=9788178243825&srno=b_1&al=VI9czj2bJnIZMwMh9a43mV5pwdgHgqdmHbh2%2B5puWWsASokwsI6mJoaLq2lx4bRfFLwHQxVDMNU%3D&ref=50702c76-c246-4f2a-afb1-c21aac2b250b#overview







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